Tuesday, November 12

Day Underwritten by Rona Rones
noon
Luncheon and Conversation with Letty Cottin Pogrebin
How To Be a Friend to a Friend Who’s Sick

Join us for a delicious lunch, followed by a talk with award-winning journalist, outspoken political activist and bestselling author Letty Cottin Pogrebin.

When diagnosed with breast cancer, Letty Cottin Pogrebin found her friends’ and family’s reactions and comments uncomfortable and awkward – until she discovered a way to convey her needs. Discussing this situation with other patients and survivors of serious health issues, she began considering the best way to be a friend to someone going through a life-altering illness. In her new book, she shares, with humor and thoughtfulness, her own story and the experiences of others in similar situations.

“A cancer survivor channels her ordeal into reflections on the nature of empathy and friendships… The author’s sharp advice illuminates many of the more common gray areas governing what to say to an ailing friend, appropriate visitation frequencies and durations, and proper gifting. She also provides tips for good behavior when a friend’s parent or child is gravely ill… A useful refresher course on navigating the complicated territory of compassionate companionship.” – Kirkus Reviews

Sponsored by National Council of Jewish Women of Greater Detroit

Co-sponsored by the Auxiliary for Jewish Senior Life, Cancer Thrivers Network for Jewish Women, IRP (Institute for Retired Professionals), Jewish Family Services Cancer Connections, Jewish Hospice & Chaplaincy Network

Tickets required to attend.
Lunch and author program: $30
Book, lunch and author program: $45
Reservations required by November 4 to 248.432.5462

1 p.m.
LandisOak Park ONLY
The JCC Active Adult Program presents...
Brazilian Love Affair, featuring Sheila Landis!

Landis has been a vital part of the Detroit area jazz scene since 1973, performing her unique vocal style and lending her distinctive voice to a wide variety of musical settings. Guitarist Rick Matle brings jazz, rock and blues influences into the mix. The two met in 1990 and have worked together ever since. They have performed in various local night spots, coffee houses and in several jazz festivals.

Don’t miss your chance to see them in this concert!

Tickets $5 at the door.
Advanced purchase unavailable.

2 p.m.
Jeremy Dauber
The Worlds of Sholem Aleichem: The Remarkable Life and Afterlife of the Man Who Created Tevye

Sholem Rabinovitch was 15 years old when he wrote his first book, a Jewish version of Robinson Crusoe. He became one of the founders of modern Yiddish literature, the man behind “Tevye” and the author of some of the most memorable stories about life in the shtetl.

Sholem Aleichem was the son of a successful merchant who lost all his money, leaving the family destitute. Sholem found work as a tutor – then wed his student. He became a writer who found tremendous success in both Europe and the U.S. When he died in 1916, more than 150,000 attended his funeral.

Jeremy Dauber is a professor of Yiddish literature at Columbia University, where he also serves as director of its Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies. He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard and his doctorate from the University of Oxford, which he attended as a Rhodes Scholar.

“Dauber brings to his task a comprehensive knowledge not only of Sholem Aleichem’s life but also of the contexts – historical and literary – in which he wrote and thrived. His prose is swift, clean, and clear, and the portrait that emerges is sharply focused.” – Kirkus Reviews (starred)

Co-sponsored by David Horodoker Organization, IRP (Institute for Retired Professionals), Jewish Genealogical Society of Michigan, Jewish Parents Institute, Jewish Senior Life, Workmen’s Circle/Arbeter Ring

7:30 p.m.
Jeremy Dauber
The Worlds of Sholem Aleichem: The Remarkable Life and Afterlife of the Man Who Created Tevye

Sholem Rabinovitch was 15 years old when he wrote his first book, a Jewish version of Robinson Crusoe. He became one of the founders of modern Yiddish literature, the man behind “Tevye” and the author of some of the most memorable stories about life in the shtetl.

Sholem Aleichem was the son of a successful merchant who lost all his money, leaving the family destitute. Sholem found work as a tutor – then wed his student. He became a writer who found tremendous success in both Europe and the U.S. When he died in 1916, more than 150,000 attended his funeral.

Jeremy Dauber is a professor of Yiddish literature at Columbia University, where he also serves as director of its Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies. He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard and his doctorate from the University of Oxford, which he attended as a Rhodes Scholar.

“Dauber brings to his task a comprehensive knowledge not only of Sholem Aleichem’s life but also of the contexts – historical and literary – in which he wrote and thrived. His prose is swift, clean, and clear, and the portrait that emerges is sharply focused.” – Kirkus Reviews (starred)

Co-sponsored by David Horodoker Organization, IRP (Institute for Retired Professionals), Jewish Genealogical Society of Michigan, Jewish Parents Institute, Jewish Senior Life, Workmen’s Circle/Arbeter Ring

Patron Night, with Peter Max
7 p.m.
Peter Max
The Universe of Peter Max

The art world had never seen anything like Peter Max. His images of Mick Jagger, the Mona Lisa, the Statue of Liberty and George Washington were wild swirls of bold and bright color.

He was the official artist for the Grammys, five Super Bowl games and the Olympics, and his work appeared everywhere from the cover of U.S. News & World Report to a Boeing 777. The Universe of Peter Max contains some of the artist’s most dazzling works and tells the extraordinary story of his life. He was born in Berlin, and then moved with his family to Shanghai to escape the Nazis. It was in China, filled with parades and larger-than-life images and dragon floats in the sky, that he first became mesmerized by color – and by American comic books, which he regularly bought from a street vendor.

Later, the family moved to Israel, where Peter discovered a new passion: astronomy, which would have a lasting effect on his art. He studied at the Louvre and then settled in New York, where he learned print making and began creating his extraordinary posters which, in the words of the Village Voice, showed him to be “a visionary fascinated by time, space and evolution.”

Sponsored by the Janice Charach Gallery

Lecture only. JCC members $18/non-members $25

The Janice Charach Gallery presents a limited exhibit of works by Peter Max for purchase.